Proportional Canons at Tokyo

Last week I travelled to Tokyo, Japan, to present a paper at the quinquennial congress of the International Musicological Society on some of my recent findings on proportional canons from c.1390 to c.1500. This research is part of a larger project that I am conducting with Denis Collins on Canonic Techniques and Musical Change, c. 1330–c.1530. While we have been doing much work last year on the fourteenth-century canon, these are relatively straight-forward examples in which voices imitated each other at the unison after a certain delay between voice entries. The latter is commonly called in technical parlance the interonset interval or IOI. Continue reading “Proportional Canons at Tokyo”

Identity and Locality in Early European Music Now in Paperback

Just in time for your summer or winter reading list–depending on in which hemisphere of the Earth you reside–Routledge has announce that Identity and Locality in Early European Music, 1028-1740, ed. Jason Stoessel, originally published by Ashgate in 2009 has been reissued in an affordable paperback edition. This reissue is part of the Routledge Paperback Direct (RPD) programme and, as such, no changes were made to the hardback edition at all. RPD is the Routledge way of publishing paperback editions of successful hardbacks, available for authors and individual customers to purchase directly from the Routledge website. For further details, see the Routledge order page:

https://www.routledge.com/Identity-and-Locality-in-Early-European-Music-10281740/Stoessel/p/book/9780754664871

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Review of Schiltz’s new book

My review of Katelijne Schiltz’s Music and Riddle Culture in the Renaissance (OUP) has recently appeared in Music and Letters. Full citation:

Jason Stoessel, “Music and Riddle Culture in the Renaissance. By Katelijne Schiltz (review).” Music and Letters 97, no. 2 (2016): 327-329. doi: 10.1093/ml/gcw030

Oxford University Press has provided free access to the review via this link (HTML) or this link (PDF) for use on my personal research blog. Enjoy my review and I hope that it encourages you to read this book on a fascinating topic.

Review article and another review

I’m delighted to inform readers that my review article “Editing Early English Music” has recently appeared in Musicology Australia, the journal of the Musicological Society of Australia. In it, I compare two recent editions of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century music with connections to English composers, sources or musical styles: Reinhard Strohm’s Fifteenth-Century Liturgical Music, 6: Mass Settings from the Lucca Choirbook and David Fallows’s Secular Polyphony 1380–1480. I explore some of the difficulties faced by editors assembling a repertoire of musical compositions under the label of “English” and their different approaches to music editing. A complimentary copy of the article is available for the first 50 readers. If you have institutional access Musicology Australia you might like to follow this link instead.

I also authored a short review for the same issue of Musicology Australia on Margaret Bent’s recent book, Magister Jacobus de Ispania, Author of the Speculum Musicae. Bent has put forward in her book a fascinating new hypothesis concerning the origin of one of the most important music theorists of the early fourteenth century, proposing he can be identified with one of the founders of Oriel College, Oxford: James of Spain. My thoughts on Bent’s hypothesis and other interesting aspects of her book can be read in this complimentary copy here or by institutional subscribers to Musicology Australia here.

Post July 2015 Conference roundup

The first three weeks of July have been a whirlwind of musicological activity, starting with hosting Graeme Boone for his great talk on music and emotions in the early songs of Du Fay for the 26th Gordon Athol Anderson Memorial Lecture (follow the link for more information), followed by a short week in Brussels (Belgium) for the Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference (MedRen) and then back to Australia for the Biennial Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS). (For those unaccustomed to transglobal travel, the flight from Australia to Europe takes between 22 to 27 hours on a good airline with only one stop on the way.)

Continue reading “Post July 2015 Conference roundup”

I say data, you say data

John Stinson and Jason Stoessel, “Encoding Medieval Music Notation for Research,” Early Music 42, no. 4 (2014): 613–17. doi: 10.1093/em/cau093.

What do medieval music and computers have to do with each other, especially since the only “calculators” in the fourteenth century were clever sophists and theologians from Oxford? Well, it turns out quite a bit. The latest issue of Early Music, guest edited by Dan Tidhar, contains numerous articles on the theme of Early Music and modern technology. Several articles examine how computer-assisted research is revolutionising some of the ways music historians can approach medieval music.

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Continue reading “I say data, you say data”

Louis II of Anjou and Mod A?

I’ve just had my first fully online, open access journal article published. It’s not the first time my research has been published online, but my previous articles were dual-mode published in print and online. And, in a strange twist that is indicative of the state of medieval musicology in Australia, this is my first article published in this country: all others have appeared in journals published in the United Kingdom, United States and Europe. Anyway, enough of that.

Continue reading “Louis II of Anjou and Mod A?”